I usually don’t do this…

Back in February I was contacted by F.R.I.E.N.D.S. (Florida Research Institute for Equine Nurturing Development and Safety) to see if I might be interested in helping with a fundraiser they are having in June.  The help they were wanting was to paint a pig.  As in a little ceramic piggy bank.  Since the organization supports horses and a couple of other farm animals, and most equestrians love farm animals, they decided on the piggy banks for artists around the country to get creative.  The only requirement was that they had to have them by the end of March.

The fundraiser is an online auction that is from June 1 to June 15, 2017.  For tickets (if you plan on being in the area) or more info, please visit their website by clicking here.

I usually don’t do too many fundraisers, not that I am not wanting to give, but I am usually busy or already have my giving lined up for the year.  I gave it some thought and immediately had a couple of ideas come to mind:  a Jump Hog (for the English riders) and a Trail Hog (for the Western riders).  I asked for two and immediately set to work.  Below is a record of the process and the end result.  Would love to know your thoughts on these!

 

Pigs before modifications- Denny Martindale
Pigs upon arrival to the studio
Tools for creating saddles- Denny Martindale
Tools used to create saddles, exclusive of paint

I wanted to mold saddles on the banks, and leave the coin slot opening intact.  I started applying blobs of drywall paste to start forming the saddles.  This had to be done in small applications as the blobs of paste would start sagging down the sides and flattening out.  So, that meant a number of apply/dry sessions to get the desired forms.

English saddle taking shape- Denny Martindale
Drywall paste applied with spoon to start forming English saddle
Western saddle taking shape- Denny Martindale
Drywall paste applied with spoon to start forming Western saddle

Next, it was time to shave with an artist’s knife and sand for a clean, smooth finish to prep for painting.

Western saddle after some sanding- Denny Martindale
Western saddle almost ready for paint
English saddle after some sanding- Denny Martindale
English saddle is ready for paint

I then began painting with latex house paint, added a couple of layers of satin acrylic varnish, and finally added a few adornments for reins and bling!

Jump Hog bank 1- Denny MartindaleJump Hog bottom- Denny MartindaleJump Hog top- Denny Martindale

Jump Hog front- Denny Martindale
Jump Hog, ready for the event!

Trail Hog top- Denny MartindaleTrail Hog saddle detail- Denny MartindaleTrail Hog front- Denny Martindale

Trail Hog bank- Denny Martindale
Trail Hog ready for the auction!

This was a really fun project, and I hope they bring a good price for the fundraiser.  Hope you all have a blessed week!

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To Germany With Love

Once again a client in Bavaria asked if I could paint on a couple of buckets for her to give this Christmas as gifts for their children.  I said of course, and the hunt began for a couple of older buckets that were in decent shape.  Some of the old buckets are in bad shape and actually need to be reshaped, but these were pretty good.  They sent me some photos for reference, and I set to work prepping, painting and sealing.  I finished them in time to ship out (international shipping takes a very long time during the month of December, so when the post office says to get your item in the mail by December 1, they mean it!) and received notification that they had arrived in Germany.

Daughter’s Bucket

helene-and-pets-side-1-denny-martindalehelene-and-pets-side-2-denny-martindale

 

Son’s Bucket

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The insides of the buckets are painted to have an antique metal appearance.  They are both coated in spar urethane.  I thoroughly enjoyed working on these pieces, and I just love the dress of the children and the flowers in their horse’s manes.  As always I was happy to hear they arrived and everyone loved them.  Thank you for looking and have a blessed day!

A Bavarian Carriage Tour, or Kutschen-Tour

Earlier this year the familiar little guitar strum (that’s what it sounds like to me) on my phone went off notifying me of activity on my Etsy account.  It was a message from a lady interested in commissioning me to paint a bucket for her.  As we messaged back and forth regarding details, I discovered she lived in Bavaria, as in Bavaria, Germany!  I am always amazed at how we can connect with people from all over the world, and am so honored when they appreciate my art.

She wanted the images to be of her and her husband driving her horse and carriage.  The tricky part was she wanted the bucket in a particular size range, and, she wanted it to be oval.  I said I would do some checking and get back with her, and I really didn’t think it would be too difficult to find something that would work as there are a lot of oval metal buckets out there.

I got online and started looking, perused numerous antique, junktique, and thrift stores and anything else that might have something that would work.  My cell phone was starting to load up with numerous pictures of buckets, but none of them were the correct size.  Finally, one popped up and it met all the necessary parameters.  Thank you Jesus!  I immediately sent my client photos and a description and everything was a go.  As it turns out, I believe it is a vintage galvanized mop bucket, similar to the one the janitor used in our elementary school.  The bracket underneath sat on a dolly or coaster of wheels and had a wringer mechanism on the top for the mop and the janitor would just roll it from room to room.  Fortunately it was in good condition, so I immediately set to work cleaning and prepping it for paint.

Bottom of bucket-Denny Martindale
Bottom of bucket

Upon completion, I boxed it up and sent it on it’s way, praying for a safe and timely arrival.  About a week later I received a notification that  it had passed customs and arrived at her door.  However, she stated she wanted to wait to open it until her birthday in a couple of weeks and would notify me then.  My anticipation of her seeing it and letting me know how she liked it grew, and I was grateful when she replied that it was absolutely wonderful.  I said I was honored to paint it for her, as I am with all of my clients.  Below are a few photos of the Bavarian Carriage Tour Bucket.

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Inside of bucket after I gave it an antiqued effect with latex house paint.
Working on 'Carriage Tour'-Denny Martindale
Working on the details
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Side 1
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Side 2
Side 1 Detail-Denny Martindale
Closeup of side 1
Isolde and friend with bucket
My client sent me a photo of her with her horse and her bucket

It’s Show Time!

Last month I posted the patriotic bucket I made that a friend bought from me.  She then asked if I would paint six more for the upcoming horse show her Quarter Horse organization was putting on in May. They were for the Small Fry classes (basically kids classes) and they would have the class silhouette on the front and the show logo on the back.  I said I would and worked on them diligently so I would have them done in plenty of time before deadline, which I did.

My friend invited me to the show, so I snapped a few photos of the buckets and the kids that would receive them.

Here are the photos from the Lucky 7 Classic Quarter Horse Show held in Murfreesboro, Tennessee this year:

horse shows, awards, trophies, metal art
Front of the buckets

These show the buckets that were used for the trophies for the Small Fry classes at the show.  Each one is hand painted in latex house paint.  They filled the buckets with horse treats and peppermints.

horse shows, metal art, awards
Back of buckets
awards, trophies, metal art
Awards on display in show office

 

Horse shows, awards, judging
And the winner is…

Here are the entrants to the Western Pleasure class awaiting the judges decision.  It was hectic in the awards area, so I did not get a good shot of the winner, but they were quite happy!  Again, you just never know where something may lead…

 

You Never Know Where Something Might Lead You…

It has been a while since I have posted anything!  We hosted a wonderful birthday party for a dear friend of ours who turned 80 years young!  Since we decided to have it at our place, there was a lot of cleaning and preparation to do, which has kept us very busy.  However, I have been making art as well, just not posting it.

metal art, martindale Artworks
First side of the small pail

One of the projects I created was painting with latex house paint on a small metal pail.  I decided to paint it with a patriotic theme, of red, white, and blue,  I then painted a silhouette of a girl and her horse in a showmanship or halter class at a horse show.  As for the other side of the bucket, I had no idea what I would put on it.  The bucket sat in the studio for about a month, when a friend of mine happened to see it and inquired about it.  Just another project I am working on, but not sure where I am going with it just yet, I told her.  She asked if I could paint a name on the other side, and I told her I could.  She gave me a name and she purchased it for a little girl who was leasing one of her horses.

Metal art, Martindale Artworks
Kendyl’s bucket

My friend then asked if I could paint about six or seven of them for their upcoming Quarter Horse Show.  So, I have been working diligently on them, and will post them soon.  Till next time, happy painting!

Painting on a Milk Can

One of my latest painting projects was a milk can.  It was old, with very old black paint on it that was starting to chip and had a tad bit of rust showing.  Once again I was doing the fox hunting theme which I thoroughly enjoy.

Milkcan, acrylic painting, fox hunting
This is the start of the milk can project. The grey paint is the adhesion primer, which will be completely covered in paint.
Milk can , acrylic painting, fox hunting
This is side 1 in progress
milk can, acrylic painting, fox hunting
Detail of side 1 completed
Milk can, acrylic painting, fox hunting
This is side 2 completed. This view shows the finished top.

 

After completing the painting, I placed the milk can in front of our fireplace.  It looked really good there, and I received many complements on it.  Finally, the client came to pick it up and I was sad to see it leave.  I have picked up a milk can of my own, now to get time to work on it!

 

Redoing a Mural

Back in 2003, two other artists and I painted some murals in our church for the children’s classrooms.  I primarily concentrated on painting outside the rooms to make it look like the inside of a barn.  Many of the rooms have dutch style doors to them, so I painted animal heads as though they were looking out of their stall at you.

Since then, a school has opened up in the church building, which meant the classrooms all have to have a window from the hall in each room.  Each one had it except the room with the horse head on the door.  I had painted the wall so you could also see his back above the stall wall.  The entire painting created a dilemma:  what part of the horse would be cut out to put a window in?  One of the pastors came to me to ask if I might be able to repaint the horse’s head, and they could put the window in the door.  I said I could.  Now, where to put his head?

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As you can see, the window completely took out his head.  And yes, everything in this photo except the two doorknobs, the window, and the door frame is painted with latex house paint.  You also can’t tell from the photo, but there is an angled wall on the right side of the ‘post’ that cuts the body of the horse in two.  I thought for quite a while, and finally came up with a plan.

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Why not have him looking at the children as they entered their classroom?  So I took this past Monday morning and painted over the neck of the other horse, then drew with chalk the new one.  I painted him in and I think it is actually a great composition under the circumstances.

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This is the final photo of the completed mural.