I usually don’t do this…

Back in February I was contacted by F.R.I.E.N.D.S. (Florida Research Institute for Equine Nurturing Development and Safety) to see if I might be interested in helping with a fundraiser they are having in June.  The help they were wanting was to paint a pig.  As in a little ceramic piggy bank.  Since the organization supports horses and a couple of other farm animals, and most equestrians love farm animals, they decided on the piggy banks for artists around the country to get creative.  The only requirement was that they had to have them by the end of March.

The fundraiser is an online auction that is from June 1 to June 15, 2017.  For tickets (if you plan on being in the area) or more info, please visit their website by clicking here.

I usually don’t do too many fundraisers, not that I am not wanting to give, but I am usually busy or already have my giving lined up for the year.  I gave it some thought and immediately had a couple of ideas come to mind:  a Jump Hog (for the English riders) and a Trail Hog (for the Western riders).  I asked for two and immediately set to work.  Below is a record of the process and the end result.  Would love to know your thoughts on these!

 

Pigs before modifications- Denny Martindale
Pigs upon arrival to the studio
Tools for creating saddles- Denny Martindale
Tools used to create saddles, exclusive of paint

I wanted to mold saddles on the banks, and leave the coin slot opening intact.  I started applying blobs of drywall paste to start forming the saddles.  This had to be done in small applications as the blobs of paste would start sagging down the sides and flattening out.  So, that meant a number of apply/dry sessions to get the desired forms.

English saddle taking shape- Denny Martindale
Drywall paste applied with spoon to start forming English saddle
Western saddle taking shape- Denny Martindale
Drywall paste applied with spoon to start forming Western saddle

Next, it was time to shave with an artist’s knife and sand for a clean, smooth finish to prep for painting.

Western saddle after some sanding- Denny Martindale
Western saddle almost ready for paint
English saddle after some sanding- Denny Martindale
English saddle is ready for paint

I then began painting with latex house paint, added a couple of layers of satin acrylic varnish, and finally added a few adornments for reins and bling!

Jump Hog bank 1- Denny MartindaleJump Hog bottom- Denny MartindaleJump Hog top- Denny Martindale

Jump Hog front- Denny Martindale
Jump Hog, ready for the event!

Trail Hog top- Denny MartindaleTrail Hog saddle detail- Denny MartindaleTrail Hog front- Denny Martindale

Trail Hog bank- Denny Martindale
Trail Hog ready for the auction!

This was a really fun project, and I hope they bring a good price for the fundraiser.  Hope you all have a blessed week!

Mural Part II, After

Here are the photos of the mural at the church upon completion.  Once I was done with the painting, I sealed it with Minwax Sanding Sealer to help protect the paint. 

This is a look at the mural before the sanding sealer has been applied.  Note the dull finish.
This is a look at the mural before the sanding sealer has been applied. Note the dull finish.

Once the sealer is applied, it really brings the colors to life.

Farm art, barns, latex house paint, mural-Denny Martindale
Feed stall
Farm art, mural, horse, bluebird, equine art-Denny Martindale
Horse and bluebird
farm art, mural, latex house paint-Denny Martindale
Tack room
farm tractor, Ford 8N, latex house paint, mural-Denny Martindale
Tractor bay

When I painted the mural that had to be removed, I had a good friend, Donna, help me as we had a serious deadline on that one.  We decided to paint her husband’s old Ford 8N tractor next to a horse in a stall.  When asked to redo it this time, I wondered if Donna would want to help me with the tractor again.  On the first mural, we had painted it from the back as though it had just been pulled in.  This time, I decided to reverse it, as her husband Greg went to heaven a couple of years ago.  She jumped at the chance and we had a good time putting it back where it belongs.

Ford 8N, farm tractor, mural-Denny Martindale
Donna roughing in the shape of Greg’s tractor

At the end of the hallway I painted barn doors against the red outside boards of a barn.

mural, farm art-Denny Martindale
End of hallway with barn doors

I hope you have enjoyed the tour of the mural, it was fun to paint.  I love to see the reactions and comments from the children, and everyone has their favorite character. 

 

Cows, farm scene on old cream can

cream can, farm art
Old cream can, original condition

A client of mine asked if I could paint something on this old cream can she had picked up somewhere.  A cream can is different from a milk can in that it is much smaller, this one just 10″ high x 7″ across.  It was used for storing the cream that settles to the top of raw milk (aka non-homogenized, unlike milk purchased at a regular grocery store) as the cream was a bit thicker and sweeter than the milk itself and some folks like to use the cream separately.  I was very interested in the challenge.  She really didn’t have anything in mind, but she did like the pieces I had done with the fox hunters.  I thought about it off and on while working on some others pieces, and I finally decided that a cream can needed, well, a farm scene on it.  I cleaned it up and discovered the eagle and stars appear to be decals, so it is probably a later version of cream can.

 

old cream can, farm art
Part of the farm scene on old cream can

I was not sure exactly what to do with the lid, but in my mind I could see the endless sky in a dome affect.  I wanted a similar style to the fox hunters, but needed to have more of a farm scene, so, using latex house paint, I painted dairy and beef cattle, with the fences, stream, house and barns, silo and corn crib.

old cream can, farm art
Rest of farm scene on old cream can

I decided to put sheep in the distance near the house.  This piece does not have a single horse on it!  My client hasn’t seen it yet, so I am anxious to see what she thinks!